Let Toys Be Toys campaign is asking the toy and publishing industries to stop limiting children’s interests by promoting some toys and books as only suitable for girls, and others only for boys.

Find out more about the Let Toys Be Toys campaign.

composite of images of preschool TV

Girls on TV – who’s watching?

Let Toys Be Toys are taking part in a panel session at this year’s Children’s Media Conference, which brings together programme makers, publishers, producers and broadcasters. Campaigner Jess Day looks at the links between toy marketing and children’s media, and why discussion of how girls are represented in media needs to talk about boys too.

Read more…

Girl saves goal in front of goalposts in a garden

Football fun: Let Toys Be Toys Gift Guide

The Women’s World Cup kicks off in Canada this weekend, proving that football fun isn’t just for the boys. Check out some great toys and books that footy fans – boys and girls – will love.

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Recruiting – teacher volunteers

Let Toys Be Toys is seeking qualified teachers to volunteer to help build up our schools resources. Could you help us? Read more…

pirate and princess party bags

Princess or Pirate – what’s wrong with mixed parties?

Princess or Pirate? Deborah Nicholls-Lee looks at the pink-blue divide in the children’s party market and asks why shops seem to think boys and girls aren’t friends?

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Care2 impact prize

Care2 Impact Prize for Let Toys Be Toys

We’re thrilled to have been recognised for innovative and high-impact campaigning in the Care2 Awards.

The Awards, presented at the annual eCampaigning Forum event in Oxford, recognise campaigns and initiatives with an outstanding impact on the field of online advocacy, online fundraising, or both. The winner receives a cash donation of £1000 from Care2. Read more…

Checking in with Toys R Us

You may remember we met with Toys R Us in September 2013 when they committed to a more inclusive approach to toy marketing. We’ve certainly seen improvements since then, but we still have some questions over their timescale for change.

We’ve contacted Managing Director Roger McLaughlan by e-mail to find out if they have any updates. Read more…

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Scholastic responds to petition from Els, 8

Good news that young campaigner Els has heard back from publisher Scholastic, in response to her petition asking them to stop promoting books labelled ‘for boys’ or ‘for girls’ in their school book fairs. Read their response, and find out what Els and her friends have to say. Read more…

Five Princess Leia figures and two Han Solo toys from the original Star Wars

Star Wars: where is Princess Leia?

This Star Wars Day (May the Fourth…) lifelong Star Wars fan and stay-at-home-Dad-blogger Simon Ragoonanan senses a disturbance in the force, and asks… where are all the women?

When I was a child in the seventies, the first fellow Star Wars fan I knew was a girl who lived round the corner. Together, we played with our Star Wars toys and her way into it was her beloved Princess Leia figure. There wasn’t anything odd about a boy and girl playing together, let alone a girl being into Star Wars. Read more…

Children hold up Let Books Be Books written on pieces of paper

WIN: Scholastic agrees to let books be books

Following a petition from 8-year-old Els, Scholastic has become the ninth UK publisher to agree to drop ‘for girls’ and ‘for boys’ labels from books.

Els has written to Scholastic asking them to stop stocking books labelled ‘for boys’ or ‘for girls’ in the book fairs that regularly visit the school. Says Els in her letter, “No books should be ‘for boys’ or ‘for girls’… Books should be for everyone and we all like different things.” She gathered support from friends at school, getting over 80 signatures for her petition. Read more…

Child's drawing of a person holding a book that says 'Let Books Be Books' on the cover, surrounded by children's names

‘No books should be ‘for boys’ or ‘for girls” Els, 8, tells Scholastic

Eight-year-old Els was really annoyed to see books labelled ‘for boys’ or ‘for girls’ in the range brought to her school by the regular Scholastic book fair. Annoyed enough to want to write to the publisher, and get her school friends and their grown ups behind her. Read more…